When did the first Star Rider game come out?

When did the first Star Rider game come out?

Star Rider is a laserdisc-based arcade racing game developed by Computer Creations and Williams Electronics and released in 1983. The object of the game is to win a futuristic motorcycle race that takes place in surrealistic settings.

What’s the object of the game Star Rider?

The object of the game is to win a futuristic motorcycle race that takes place in surrealistic settings. The tracks themselves and the background graphics are video played from a laserdisc, and are of higher quality than possible with real-time computer graphics at the time. The foreground graphics and racers are superimposed on the video.

Who are the people who made Star Rider?

R.J. Mical coordinated the project, Ken Lantz directed software development, Richard Witt was lead programmer, and John Newcomer was the creative director. The laser disc video production was outsourced to a third-party company, Computer Creations, of South Bend, Indiana.

Where was the laser disc Star Rider made?

The laser disc video production was outsourced to a third-party company, Computer Creations, of South Bend, Indiana. Witt and Lantz developed a means by which the first few lines of NTSC video signal contained data about the roadway, so that animated riders could appear to follow the track. You may like this Did Sploder shut down?

Star Rider is a laserdisc-based arcade racing game developed by Computer Creations and Williams Electronics and released in 1983. The object of the game is to win a futuristic motorcycle race that takes place in surrealistic settings.

The object of the game is to win a futuristic motorcycle race that takes place in surrealistic settings. The tracks themselves and the background graphics are video played from a laserdisc, and are of higher quality than possible with real-time computer graphics at the time. The foreground graphics and racers are superimposed on the video.

What was the first video game in 1984?

December – Atari Games releases Marble Madness, their first game written in the C programming language and to use a 68000-family microprocessor. Bally Midway releases Demolition Derby, which features a damage bar and the ability to join a game in progress.

R.J. Mical coordinated the project, Ken Lantz directed software development, Richard Witt was lead programmer, and John Newcomer was the creative director. The laser disc video production was outsourced to a third-party company, Computer Creations, of South Bend, Indiana.

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